Archive for November 16th, 2009

Fatigue Blamed in I-71 Accident Involving Tractor-Trailer

Monday, November 16th, 2009
Fatigue Common Cause of Accident

Fatigue Common Cause of Tractor Trailer Accidents

Police have determined that the driver of a semi-tractor trailer involved in a one truck accident on I-71 in Carrolton fell asleep immediately prior to the accident.  The accident shutdown the northbound lanes for eight hours.  The driver suffered only minor injuries.  The Courier Journal has the specifics, here.

Of course, the driver and other cars using the roadway were fortunate only the tractor trailer was involed.  The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) estimates that truck driver fatigue may be a factor in over 1/3 of large truck accidents.  If you are driving on the Interstates or large highways where tractor trailers are common there is a good chance you may be involved in an accident resulting from driver fatigue.  If you are involved in such an accident and need an attorney, make sure you retain one experienced in handling these types of cases and the companies who defend them.

Exercise Caution and Common Sense When Approaching an Accident.

Monday, November 16th, 2009
Exercise Caution at Accident Scenes

Exercise Caution at Accident Scenes

Rush hour traffic is always a nightmare.  Whether it’s during the morning when the roads are full of school buses or in the afternoon when the roads are full of commuters, rush hour can be the most stressful and also the most dangerous time for accidents.  However, it is during this time that drivers must exercise the most caution and common sense.

This morning I witnessed an accident on a heavily traveled two lane road.  One car had been driven into a deep ditch on one side, while the other car was stopped in the middle of the road.  The car in the middle of the road did not have on its hazard lights and it was difficult to see that an accident had occurred.  The good news is that both driver’s appeared uninjured.

Unfortunately, cars on the side of the road where the accident occurred continued driving between the two cars in the accident.  This created an even more dangerous situation.  Cars trying to go through the accident scene endangered not only those persons involved in the accident, but endangered other drivers on the roadway.  They also increased the chance that another, more serious accident, was going to happen.  Fortunately, a police officer was only a few cars away approaching the scene.

There is no doubt that the fact it was rush hour and drivers were in a hurry contributed to the lack of caution.  If you approach an accident scene please be sure to exercise extreme caution, but most importantly common sense.  If you approach an accident and have time to plan, use a different route.  If you can go around the accident without endangering yourself or others, do so.  However, you should never travel through an accident scene.  If you must stop your vehicle to avoid going through the accident scene, do so.  Causing a second accident or injuring those in the first is not worth the extra time it takes waiting for emergency assistance or for the drivers to clear the road.  If you approach an accident treat it with extreme caution and exercise common sense to avoid making a bad situation worse.  Don’t forget, if you are in an noninjury accident, move your vehicle from the road to avoid creating a dangerous situation.